tbyl book club

August TBYL Book Club (we’re back!)

It’s been a little while between books, but I thought it would be fun to start up our online TBYL Book Club again!

For those new to That Book You Like… the TBYL Book Club is an online book club designed specifically for those of us who live busy lives, live remotely or just generally have trouble getting to face-to-face book club catch-ups.

The club will allow you to connect with fellow book-lovers in our online community, and to get involved in an amazing range of online forums about the book of the month. The chats run for three days at the end of each month, so you’ve got the flexibility to pop in and chat whenever you’ve got the time.

Each month brings you a new, exciting book to read, discuss and share. It’s a perfect excuse to get reading, and to make time to chat with other readers about great books.

only the animalsThis month, I’m suggesting that we read Ceridwen Dovey’s Only the Animals (Penguin)…

The souls of ten animals caught up in human conflicts over the last century tell their astonishing stories of life and death. In a trench on the Western Front a cat recalls her owner Colette’s theatrical antics in Paris. In Nazi Germany a dog seeks enlightenment. A Russian tortoise once owned by the Tolstoys drifts in space during the Cold War. In the siege of Sarajevo a bear starving to death tells a fairytale. And a dolphin sent to Iraq by the US Navy writes a letter to Sylvia Plath…

… An animal’s-eye view of humans at out brutal, violent worst and our creative, imaginative best, it asks us to find our way back to empathy not only for animals, but for other people, and to believe again in the redemptive power of reading and writing fiction.

You can read my review of this really stunning collection of short stories, here…

I’d like to invite you to read Only the Animals during August, ready for us to chat about on the TBYL Facebook page starting Monday, 18 August 2014. If you’d like a reminder, RSVP to the Facebook event here and I’ll give you a shout when we start chatting.

I really hope you’ll join us!

Chatter: TBYL Reviewers in July

On the weekend I had a chance to catch up with some of the TBYL Reviewers. It was a chance to have a chat, drink some tea and have them pick a few books they’d like to read and review for the blog. I’m really keen to move That Book You Like… in a really collaborative direction this year, and part of making that happen is catching up with this wonderful group of bookish friends more regularly. I am very excited about being able to bring new voices, new ideas and new reviews to the blog, and just quietly, I think they might be excited too.

chatSo, on a chilly Sunday afternoon, we sat around the fire in my humble ‘library’ and talked about all kinds of things. Here’s a few of the things that we chatted about, I’d love to hear what you think on these topics too…

We talked about what we’d been reading lately, always one of my favourite things to do. Stephanie had just finished Paper Towns, by John Green. She’d been impressed, a fan of young adult lit, and this book didn’t disappoint. This got us on to talking about The Fault in our Stars (as you might expect) and about the target demographic of YA fiction. I wondered out loud if I would ever be able to convincingly write a teenage voice, I feel so far away from 16-years-old at the moment, I think I would be too self conscious to even try. Tam suggested that maybe that that is what it is to be a talented author, the skill and empathy to write in many voices, even ones far removed from yourself.

What do you think? Do you think an adult can authentically write teen?

Tam and Narelle had both been busy reading books from the TBYL Reading Pile, Tam with Crimson Dawn (Allen and Unwin), and Narelle with The Priority List (Allen and Unwin). They’ve since written reviews for me to share, which will be coming up next week.

Carolyn had just finished Margaret Atwood’s The Year of the Flood. It broke a bit of a reading drought for her, so I asked her if she’d mind putting a few words down on what she thought of the novel:

the year of the floodThe Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood follows two women, Toby and Ren, who have independently survived a pandemic, each believing that they are the only person left in the world. The story alternates between each woman, both of whom managed to remain barricaded when the waterless flood hit. Both Toby and Ren tell their story, of when they were part of the cult “God’s Gardeners” before the outbreak.

The Year of The Flood is the follow-up book to Atwood’s 2003 novel Oryx and Crake and it is these characters who appear throughout the second instalment but under different names. It is not until the end that you realise who they are and their connection to Toby and Ren.

I loved this book and was gripped until the end. It is set in the future in a world that I personally hope never eventuates, where pigs have been spliced with human brains making them more intelligent, and lions and lambs have been combined, making them appear gentle yet have the ferocity of a lion. Atwood’s storytelling is brilliant and if you are a fan of hers, then I think you will thoroughly enjoy this book.

As for myself, I raved a little more about Ceridwen Dovey’s Only the Animals, which I reviewed last week. I can’t stop recommending it, and I think it’s voices will stay fresh in my mind for a little while yet.

I’d love to hear about what you’re reading at the moment…

We had a bit of a chat about book clubs, about how great they are, but how difficult it can be to keep up the momentum – life gets so busy! Carolyn mentioned that her mum had been going to the same book club for over twenty years! Can you image?!

That got me to thinking about the fact that we’ve not had an online TBYL Book Club book for ages. I’ve been missing it, and so next month I’m going suggest a book for us all to share. Stay tuned next week for details of the what and when…

Are you part of a book club? Do you find it hard to make time to chat about what you’re reading?

Throughout the afternoon a whole bundle of titles were mentioned; The Book of Rachel, which made me think of The Red TentHaruki Murakami’s 1Q84 and The Hottest State, by Ethan Hawke (random, I know). We talked about the scandal that was Judy Bloom’s Forever and Carolyn shared with us how this little book from the 70s managed to sully her reputation at high school (well, almost).

pretty funny tea cosiesOnce we’d finished up, the guys took their picks from the TBYL Reading Pile, all of them walking away with some amazing stories to enjoy. I’m particularly pleased that Narelle took a copy of Pretty Funny Tea Cosies and Other Beautiful Knitted Things, by Loani Prior (Murdoch Books). Just quietly I’m hoping she knits something from it, she’s so wonderfully crafty and these tea cosies could not be cuter!

In short, this all means that we’ve got lots of new reviews in store for you guys. They’ve even agreed to help out with our book clubs in the future, and I’ve invited them to review other lovely things the do and see. I can’t wait to hear what they’re up to!

If you’d like to find out more about fantastic team of TBYL Reviewers, pop over and read a little more here…

Any of the titles mentioned here tickle your fancy? I’d love to know what’s next on your reading pile…

Colour and Dance: The Pagoda Tree

This month’s TBYL Book Club book has been the stunningly crafted The Pagoda Tree by Claire Scobie (Penguin). I’m very much looking forward to chatting with Claire this evening (join in here) but in the meantime I thought I’d share with you my review of this beautiful novel…

pagodaThere are a many adjectives that I could use to describe Claire’s novel – it is rich, complex, exotic and erotic, bloody and beautiful. Each individual word can be used to describe a particular scene in The Pagoda Tree, but it is only when these elements combine that you experience the true intensity of this story. Its rich colours and aromas leap from the page, the horrors visited upon the characters that you grow to love tear you apart, and of course, the complexity of relationships, traditions and cultures draw you completely into Maya’s story…

Maya dances like no other. She becomes the dance . . . Her dance can steal a man’s soul.

Tanjore, 1765. Maya plays among the towering granite temples of this ancient city in the heart of southern India. Like her mother before her, she is destined to become adevadasi, a dancer for the temple. She is instructed in dance, the mystical arts and lovemaking. It is expected she will be chosen as a courtesan for the prince himself.
 
But as Maya comes of age, India is on the cusp of change and British dominance has risen to new heights. The prince is losing his power and the city is sliding into war. Maya is forced to flee her ancestral home, and heads to the bustling port city of Madras, where East and West collide. 
 
Maya captivates all who watch her dance. Thomas Pearce, an ambitious young Englishman who has travelled to India to make his fortune, is entranced from the moment he first sees her. But their love is forbidden, and comes at enormous cost.

Maya as protagonist is a beauty, destined from birth for great things. But, as is foretold, her path is unclear and all throughout this novel neither she nor the reader is entirely sure where the future will lead her. She is lead, with little say in her own life, to what would seem a chosen position in favour with the Prince. She is honoured but unsure, and is left shaken when the path that had been laid out for her is destroyed by politics and conflicts well outside of her control.

The women in Maya’s life are complex, her mother Lakshmi loves her but is committed unerringly to her role in the temple, and in turn to the role which Maya must play – she bears the signs of the goddess . She is caring but harsh. Interestingly, this harshness makes Maya love her no less, as if she is aware in some way of the protection that her mother is to her…

She began to wash her daughter. She ground dried turmeric root and mixed it into a paste with gram flour, sandalwood, milk and honey. She smeared the mixture over Maya’s back and neck, rubbing it hard under the ears and down across her narrow frame, her roughed hands scratching her most tender parts. By the end Maya glowed deep yellow.

Palani, mentor to Maya and once courtesan to the King is enlivened by Maya’s presence, draws great satisfaction from her ability to teach her apprentice the art of dance (and service) and shares a deep connection with the young girl. That does not stop her from lashing out with great vitriol at times, as Maya represents in no uncertain terms the fact that Palani must relinquish her position to this younger, more virile royal companion. Still, as Palani struggles to accept her own progression from court to cave, she seems to take comfort in the transference of her skills and duties to Maya.

For me, these complicated female relationships are by far the most compelling element of this story.

Further to this though, The Pagoda Tree bears undeniable evidence of meticulous research. No detail has been left unconsidered, from the colour, the sound, the smell of the landscape and homes, courts and people. The emotions, conversations and reactions of the characters appear incredibly authentic, as does the history woven throughout this tale. It was honestly transporting, ensuring that I closed the book wanting to find out more about this time and place.

I hope you’ll read this novel, it is an incredible experience. Likewise, I hope you’ll join us on Facebook this evening (Monday, 28 Oct 7:30pm EST) for a chat with the author, Claire Scobie.

If you’d like to find out more about Claire Scobie’s The Pagoda Tree, visit the Penguin website here…

October TBYL Book Club and a Chat with Claire

Oh my god, it’s ten days into October!! How did that happen?

Were you wondering what book we’re reading for this month’s TBYL Book Club? Well if you were, it’s a beautiful book that I’m sure you’ll love! This month we’re going to be reading Claire Scobie’s The Pagoda Tree (Penguin)…

pagodaMaya dances like no other. She becomes the dance . . . Her dance can steal a man’s soul.

Tanjore, 1765. Maya plays among the towering granite temples of this ancient city in the heart of southern India. Like her mother before her, she is destined to become adevadasi, a dancer for the temple. She is instructed in dance, the mystical arts and lovemaking. It is expected she will be chosen as a courtesan for the prince himself.
 
But as Maya comes of age, India is on the cusp of change and British dominance has risen to new heights. The prince is losing his power and the city is sliding into war. Maya is forced to flee her ancestral home, and heads to the bustling port city of Madras, where East and West collide. 
 
Maya captivates all who watch her dance. Thomas Pearce, an ambitious young Englishman who has travelled to India to make his fortune, is entranced from the moment he first sees her. But their love is forbidden, and comes at enormous cost.

Weaving together the uneasy meeting of two cultures, The Pagoda Tree is a captivating story of love, loss and fate.

If you’d like to join in, the discussion will be happening on our Facebook page, starting Monday 28 October through to 30 October. Plus I’m really excited about the fact that we’ll be chatting with Claire too!

Our next TBYL Event is a live Facebook chat with Claire herself. I can’t wait, it’s happening on Monday 28 October, 7:30pm (EST) and you can RSVP here…

I hope you’ll join us!

Pick up a copy of Claire’s book here, and click here to get a reminder when we start chatting about this wonderful novel.

September TBYL Book Club

It’s that time again when I pick a book that I think we’ll all enjoy talking about…

This month’s book will have you guessing from cover to cover. What is real? Who is Frida? Where did that tiger come from?

the night guestI’d like to invite you to read Fiona McFarlane’s The Night Guest (Penguin) during September, ready for us to chat about on Facebook starting Monday, 30 September 2013.

One morning Ruth wakes thinking a tiger has been in her seaside house. Later that day a formidable woman called Frida arrives, looking as if she’s blown in from the sea. In fact she’s come to care for Ruth. Frida and the tiger: both are here to stay, and neither is what they seem.

Which of them can Ruth trust? And as memories of her childhood in Fiji press upon her with increasing urgency, can she even trust herself?

If you’d like to know more about the book, I’ll be posting my review of The Night Guest on Monday next week, along with an author interview with Fiona.

To join in make sure you like us on Facebook. To find out more about the TBYL Book Club visit here.

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Out Now! TBYL News: All Things Bookish August 2013

This month’s edition of TBYL News: All Things Bookish… is now out, complete with give-aways, new reviews and upcoming events at That Book You Like…

honey brown and cover 2This month we’re enjoying conversations with two talented Australian authors – Kate Forsyth and Honey Brown. It’s a fantastic chance to get to know these authors a little better, and to find out more about how they write, about their titles and a little of what’s next for them! Online author chats are a new addition to TBYL and I hope you’ll enjoy them as much as I do.

Also, there’s lots of new reviews to be read on the TBYL Blog, a chance to win a copy of the intriguing novel Torn, by Karen Turner, and also great new items in the TBYL Store.

Happy reading, enjoy our August edition!

Click here to read TBYL News: All Things Bookish… August 2013

If you’d like to subscribe to the newsletter, you can click here.

This’ll mean that you get our monthly news by email, on the first Monday of the month. Perfect!

 

August TBYL Book Club

Today we begin our conversation for the July TBYL Book Club, and I can’t wait to hear what you think of Kate Forsyth’s The Wild Girl (Random House). Personally, I’m loving it, so much so that I dreamt about it last night!

If you’d like to join in, the discussion is happening now on our Facebook page.

Also, don’t forget that our next TBYL Event is a live Facebook chat with Kate herself. I can’t wait, it’s happening on Monday 5 August, 7:30pm (EST) and you can RSVP here…

And that brings me to our book for August. I’ve been wondering what we should read for the August TBYL Book Club, and I’ve decided on something quick, suspenseful and a little bit scary!

dark horseFor August, I’m inviting you to read with us, Honey Brown’s Dark Horse (Penguin)

“It’s Christmas morning on the edge of the rugged Mortimer Ranges. Sarah Barnard saddles Tansy, her black mare. She is heading for the bush, escaping the reality of her broken marriage and her bankrupted trail-riding business.



Sarah seeks solace in the ranges. When a flash flood traps her on Devil Mountain, she heads to higher ground, taking shelter in Hangman’s Hut.

 She settles in to wait out Christmas.



A man, a lone bushwalker, arrives. Heath is charming, capable, handsome. But his story doesn’t ring true. Why is he deep in the wilderness without any gear? Where is his vehicle? What’s driving his resistance towards rescue? The closer they become the more her suspicions grow.



But to get off Devil Mountain alive, Sarah must engage in this secretive stranger’s dangerous game of intimacy”

I read this book last month and absolutely love it, it had me delightfully on edge the entire time I read it (in two sittings, I might add) and I’d love for you to share it with me.

Now, I can’t say too much more about the mystery that unfolds as Sarah and Heath wait for rescue, I’d hate to spoil the ending for you. It twists and turns with nightmarish frequency and will probably have you worried for Sarah, falling for Heath and waiting for the sky to clear so both rescue and resolution can come.

What I will say is that I’d most definitely recommend Dark Horse as a great winter read, the sound of the rain on the roof will only add to the atmosphere of the novel. Don’t be scared, it’s a fascinating read. You can read my full review here if you’d like to find out more.

I hope you’ll join us on Facebook to discuss Dark Horse. We’ll start the conversation on Monday, 26 August 2013 and carry it through to the Wednesday. If you’d like a reminder, you can RSVP to the TBYL Book Club here…

I can’t wait to hear what you think of this thriller! Happy reading!

Buy from TBYL

 

TBYL Events: Meet Kate Forsyth

Don’t you love it when the stars align?

During July, the TBYL Book Club has been reading Kate Forsyth’s latest novel The Wild Girl (Random House), a fantastical new take on the brothers Grimm. I’m really looking forward to chatting about the book on the TBYL Facebook page next Monday, 29 July.

kate forsythEven more exciting though, is that since we decided to read The Wild Girl, I’ve been in touch with the lovely Kate and we’ve been able to arrange an online chat on the evening of Monday, 5 August 2013!

That means that the next TBYL Event will be a free, interactive, online chat with Kate Forsyth!

Kate will be chatting on the TBYL Facebook page on the evening of Monday, 5 August 2013 and you can join us at 7:30pm to ask Kate questions, and get involved in in the conversation.

Kate Forsyth is the internationally bestselling author of more than twenty books, including The Witches of Eileanan and Rhiannon’s Ride series for adults, and The Puzzle Ring, The Gypsy Crown, and The Starthorn Tree for children. She has won or been nominated for numerous awards. Her books have been published in 13 different countries, including Japan, Poland, Spain and Turkey, and Kate is currently undertaking a doctorate in fairytale retellings at the University of Technology and recently published Bitter Greens a retelling of the Rapunzel story.

It’s going to be a great opportunity to find out a little more about Kate, and about her beautiful brand of fantasy!

If you’d like to make sure that you don’t forget to tune in, you can RSVP to the event here…

I hope you’ll join us!

Join us: Facebook and Twitter
Sign up for TBYL Book Club here…

Out Now! TBYL News: All Things Bookish July 2013

This month’s edition of TBYL News: All Things Bookish… is now out, complete with give-aways, new reviews and highlights from the last month at That Book You Like…

heart like mineTBYL News is a great way to catch up on recent reviews, upcoming news and words from my lovely special guests. This month you’ll find a chances to win a great book from Allen and Unwin, and find out more about this month’s TBYL Book Club Book.

Click here to read TBYL News: All Things Bookish… July 2013

If you’d like to subscribe to the newsletter, you can click here.

This’ll mean that you get our monthly news by email, on the first Monday of the month. Perfect!

Join us:   Facebook  and  Twitter
Find out more about the TBYL Book Club here

July TBYL Book Club

This month, I’ve had fun encouraging you all to read a little differently and enjoy a couple of action/adventure titles, and Intrepid Month, featuring Defender and Hunter has been fantastic.

We were lucky to hear from author Chris Allen on Monday night, and I’m sure you’ll agree that his insights into writing, publishing and reading were both entertaining and informative. I’ll be posting a summary of the online event ‘Meet Chris Allen’ in the days to come.

If you’d like to find out more about Chris Allen and his books, visit his website here.

the wild girlTonight, as we wrap up the June club, I’m pleased to announce the July TBYL Book Club book. It’s an intriguing title, suggested by a TBYL reader and one that I’ve not read myself. I’m excited to experience it with you.

This month, we’ll be reading Kate Forsyth’s The Wild Girl (Random House)…

Growing up in the German kingdom of Hessen-Cassel in the early nineteenth century, Dortchen Wild is irresistibly drawn to the boy next door, the young and handsome fairy-tale scholar Wilhelm Grimm.

It is a time of war, tyranny and terror. Napoleon Bonaparte wants to conquer all of Europe, and Hessen-Cassel is one of the first kingdoms to fall. Forced to live under oppressive French rule, the Grimm brothers decide to save the old tales that had once been told by the firesides of houses grand and small all over the land.

Dortchen knows many beautiful old stories, such as ‘Hansel and Gretel’, ‘The Frog King’ and ‘Six Swans’. As she tells them to Wilhelm, their love blossoms. Yet the Grimm family is desperately poor, and Dortchen’s father has other plans for his daughter. Marriage is an impossible dream. 

Dortchen can only hope that happy endings are not just the stuff of fairy tales…

Will you join us? If you’ve read The Wild Girl (or other Kate Forsyth novels), what should we expect?

If you’d like to join in the conversation, it’ll happen at our Facebook page on Monday, 29 July until Wednesday, 31 July 2013. If you’d like to check out a sample of Kate Forsyth’s The Wild Girl you can do so here…

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I can’t wait to read this novel, and I hope you’ll get involved in the July TBYL Book Club!

Join us: Facebook and Twitter
Sign up for TBYL Book Club here…