Gifted Liar? Rachael’s Gift

I had a chat to Narelle Connell about this novel before she wrote her review, and I think it’s fair to say she was quite conflicted. She told me that this book had really challenged her, presenting some really interesting questions regarding truth, trust, childhood and parenthood. We always have to believe our kid, don’t we? Her review today sums up the conundrum that Rachael’s Gift presents to the reader, a conundrum that you’ll keep turning over in your head long after you’ve put this book down. Here’s Narelle’s thoughts…

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 What would you do if you suspected your child was a gifted liar?

Rachael's GiftThis is the premise of Rachael’s Gift, the debut novel by Alexandra Cameron (Pan MacMillan). Rachael is fourteen years old, beautiful and a talented artist creating work well beyond her years. Her mother, Camille, is focused on securing her daughter a place at a prestigious Parisian art school so as to nurture and develop her gift. But, her carefully planned future is thrown into a tailspin when Rachael accuses one of her teachers of sexual misconduct.

Camille is horrified and leaps to the defense of her daughter.  However, questions within the school community, especially those regarding the whereabouts of a rival student’s painting, call the reliability of Racheal’s testimony into question. Unlike her mother, Rachael’s father, Wolfe is far more wary. He has his own questions about what the truth might be and, in turn, what his daughter may be capable of.

 

“She inhaled sharply and then reached out, touching my arm.

“Wolfey”, she said, her voice softer. “Honey, please. Please. There’s something else….” 

I looked away. Another bloody excuse. I was not budging. Not this time. I shook her hand off me. “I’m scared there’s something wrong with her, Cam, and I’m sick of dicking around.’ 

She shook her head in disbelief. ‘You’re going to ruin her. Don’t you realise? I can’t let you do it.’ 

Her chest heaved and then some kind of realisation dawned in her face. ‘Oh my god, you don’t love her. You wouldn’t do this if you did.’ 

It felt as if my veins were bursting. ‘Of course I love her’, I shouted. ‘Its because I love her!’ 

‘This is not love.’ 

I stabbed my finger in her face. ‘You love her too much.’ 

Her expression transformed, a light went on in her eyes and her breath evened out. ‘You’re a fucking traitor’, she hissed. ‘I won’t let you do that to her’ 

We’ll see about that, I thought as I walked away from her. ” 

 

The novel alternates narration from Camille and Wolfe, as they navigate their way to finding the truth of Rachael’s story. From the surf beaches of Australia to French art galleries steeped in history, Rachael’s Gift unfolds into a compelling story of the webs we all weave ourselves into and how our past can impact on our present no matter how far we think we’ve left it behind.

I found the storytelling a little clunky in the beginning; it took me a little while to settle into moving between the two very different voices of Camille and Wolfe. Interestingly, while the story revolves around Rachael I found myself particularly drawn to Camille’s voice, I watched her story deepen as she confronted her past and Rachael’s future. Inhabiting a world where her aunts and grandparents have Degas adorning the walls of their Parisian homes, she watches with a mixture of pride and trepidation as Rachael embraces long-lost family wholeheartedly in a ruthless bid to achieve her goals.

Towards the end I was racing to the denouement, watching the threads come together and worlds collide. Now that I’ve finish the book, it’s a novel I’m itching for others to read so I can chat about it with them. An excellent book club pick and one to share with friends who love a story they can sink their teeth into and contemplate long after finishing.

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Find out more about Rachael’s Gift, by Alexandra Cameron here…